If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site

We Are OPEN! (908) 769-5337

Click here for Telehealth appointment

Watchung (908) 769-5337
Marlboro (732) 303-0993

June 2021

Tuesday, 29 June 2021 00:00

Common Symptoms Of Poor Circulation

The medical condition known as poor circulation can cause severe foot pain. It can develop as a result of having medical ailments consisting of diabetes, high blood pressure, and elevated cholesterol levels. Some of the symptoms patients can experience with poor circulation are numbing and tingling sensations in the feet, a change in skin color, and the toenails may grow slower. Additionally, the feet may feel cold and it may be difficult to walk. Possible prevention methods can include ceasing tobacco use, incorporating a gentle exercise into your daily routine, as well as stretching. Many patients who are afflicted with this condition can benefit by eating fruits and vegetables, and drinking plenty of fresh water daily. If you have poor circulation it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can help to manage this serious condition.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Ronald Sheppard of Warren-Watchung Podiatry Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlboro and Watchung, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Saturday, 26 June 2021 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

When you think of running injuries you may visualize a broken or sprained ankle, shin splint, pulled muscle, plantar fasciitis, hamstring injury, or Achilles tendonitis. However, injuries to the toenail (such as runner’s toenail) can also be quite painful and disruptive, and should not be overlooked. Runner’s toenail, also known as black toenail, or subungual hematoma, occurs when a build-up of blood under the nail causes it to become discolored or blackened. This can occur from an acute blow to the toe or from the repetitive force that running can sometimes place on the toes. Runner’s toe can be a very painful condition which may result in the toenail eventually falling off. To help prevent this from happening, runners can make sure their sneakers are not too loose (which may cause the foot to slip forward), and not too tight (which restricts room in the toe box). Also, lacing shoes in a specific way can help retain the heel in the heel cup, and keeping toenails trimmed (but not too short) will prevent them from hitting the tip of the shoe repeatedly. For more footwear advice, or for the proper treatment of runner’s toenail and any other running injury, make an appointment with a podiatrist.

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Ronald Sheppard of Warren-Watchung Podiatry Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber; this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlboro and Watchung, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about How to Prevent Running Injuries
Tuesday, 15 June 2021 00:00

An Overview of Morton's Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a swollen, inflamed nerve in the foot. It usually occurs on the nerves between the toes. Symptoms of this condition include sharp, burning pains on the bottom of the foot, and numbness that can radiate to nearby toes. The pain of a Morton’s neuroma usually increases with activity and decreases at rest or when massaging the foot. Conservative treatments such as resting and icing the foot, taking anti-inflammatory medications, and modifying activities and footwear can alleviate symptoms. Surgery may be an option in severe or chronic cases. If you are experiencing the symptoms of Morton’s neuroma, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Ronald Sheppard of Warren-Watchung Podiatry Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlboro and Watchung, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
Tuesday, 08 June 2021 00:00

How Is Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome Treated?

Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a condition in which the posterior tibial nerve, which runs through an area called the tarsal tunnel along the inside of the ankle, is compressed. This often occurs with other foot problems, such as plantar fasciitis or acquired flat foot. Tarsal tunnel syndrome causes sharp, shooting, electrical, dull, or burning pain sensations on the inner side of the ankle and in the heel. Treatment is almost always non-surgical and includes wearing comfortable shoes or orthotics, doing stretching exercises, modifying your daily activities to limit standing and walking while you heal, and taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce pain. To learn more about treatment options for tarsal tunnel syndrome, please consult with a podiatrist.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Dr. Ronald Sheppard of Warren-Watchung Podiatry Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlboro and Watchung, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Treating Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
Tuesday, 01 June 2021 00:00

What Is a Medial Ankle Sprain?

An ankle sprain occurs when ligaments, the fibrous bands of tissue that connect bones to each other and stabilize joints, are overstretched or torn due to an injury. Most ankle sprains are lateral, affecting the ligaments along the outer edges of the ankle. A medial ankle sprain occurs when the ligament along the inner edge of the ankle is overstretched or torn. This is usually caused by a sudden twisting, turning, or rolling inward of the ankle. Symptoms may include pain on the inside of the ankle when moving or placing weight on it, swelling, bruising, and tenderness. If you suspect that you may have sprained your ankle, please see a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan. 

Ankle sprains are common but need immediate attention. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Ronald Sheppard from Warren-Watchung Podiatry Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains take place when the ligaments in your ankle are torn or stretched beyond their limits. There are multiple ways that the ankle can become injured, including twisting or rolling over onto your ankle, putting undue stress on it, or causing trauma to the ankle itself.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Mild to moderate bruising
  • Limited mobility
  • Swelling
  • Discoloration of the skin (depending on severity)

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

Treatment of a sprain depends on the severity.  Many times, people are told to rest and remain off their feet completely, while others are given an air cast. If the sprain is very severe, surgery may be required.

If you have suffered an ankle sprain previously, you may want to consider additional support such as a brace and regular exercises to strengthen the ankle.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlboro and Watchung, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains
Connect with us