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Watchung (908) 769-5337
Marlboro (732) 303-0993

December 2021

Tuesday, 28 December 2021 00:00

Plantar Fasciitis Prevention

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common foot injuries and the most frequent cause of heel pain. This condition occurs when the plantar fascia, a ligament that runs along the bottom of the foot, becomes inflamed usually due to repetitive stress and overuse. When the plantar fascia is injured, you may feel a sharp, stabbing pain in your heel and have pain in the arch of the foot. The pain is often at its worst when you take your first few steps in the morning or after a long rest. Fortunately, plantar fasciitis is both treatable and preventable. To prevent plantar fasciitis, it is suggested that you wear comfortable, well-fitted, supportive shoes, rest your feet after a workout or after standing for an extended amount of time, and stretch your feet regularly. If you are suffering from heel pain, don’t hesitate to schedule an appointment with a podiatrist near you. 

 

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Ronald Sheppard  from Warren-Watchung Podiatry Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlboro and Watchung, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Thursday, 23 December 2021 00:00

Arthritis Can Cause Pain in the Feet and Ankles

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

Tuesday, 21 December 2021 00:00

When the Wound on Your Foot Becomes an Ulcer

Wounds can occur on the feet from an injury, poor circulation, prolonged pressure from improperly fitted shoes, or complications from diseases like diabetes, neuropathy, and vascular disease. Over time, if these wounds do not close and the underlying tissue becomes affected, they are considered ulcers. These types of wounds are potentially dangerous – particularly in people with diabetes. Ulcers can lead to infections in the bone and skin. You can sometimes tell if the wound on your foot has become an ulcer if it is draining, emits a foul odor, or the tissue has become thickened, inflamed, or red. It is important to seek the professional wound care that a podiatrist can provide to help heal the wound and prevent more serious complications from developing. Podiatrists typically begin by cleaning the wound and removing any unhealthy tissue, termed debridement. Antibiotics may be prescribed if an infection is present. They may also suggest certain shoes and orthotics that will keep pressure off the wound and, in severe cases, perform surgery and other methods of wound care.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Ronald Sheppard from Warren-Watchung Podiatry Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlboro and Watchung, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Tuesday, 14 December 2021 00:00

Types of Corns and Calluses

Corns and calluses are thickened areas of skin that form as a means of protection on the feet. These thick areas primarily form where the skin has rubbed against something like a shoe. Thickened areas of skin that are larger and irregularly shaped are known as calluses. They usually indicate issues such as bone deformity, improper footwear, or a poor walking style. Hardened areas of skin that are smaller with a central core are known as corns. A variety of corns can form, including soft corns, which usually develop in areas that are moist from sweat or inadequate drying between the toes. Corns that contain nerve fibers and blood vessels are known as vascular corns, which can be very painful. Other types of corns include hard corns, fibrous corns, and seed corns. Patients with corns or calluses that persistently irritate their foot should consult with a podiatrist for treatment.  

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Ronald Sheppard of Warren-Watchung Podiatry Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlboro and Watchung, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Understanding Corns and Calluses
Tuesday, 07 December 2021 00:00

Info on Hammertoe

A muscle imbalance around the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints in the toes can cause hammertoe. Hammertoe is a common foot deformity in which one or more of the smaller toes bends upward at the middle joint. This causes the affected toes to have a hammer-like shape, in addition to causing pain, discomfort, stiff toe joints, and reduced toe mobility, as well as difficulty walking comfortably and finding shoes that fit properly. Treatments for hammertoe may include wearing shoes with a wide toe box, wearing a splint or other orthotic device, or getting surgery to correct the deformity if it is severe. If you are afflicted with hammertoes, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist as soon as possible. 

Hammertoe

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact Dr. Ronald Sheppard from Warren-Watchung Podiatry Center. Our doctor will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that affects the joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes of your feet. It is a painful foot condition in which these toes curl and arch up, which can often lead to pain when wearing footwear.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the affected toes
  • Development of corns or calluses due to friction
  • Inflammation
  • Redness
  • Contracture of the toes

Causes

Genetics – People who are genetically predisposed to hammertoe are often more susceptible

Arthritis – Because arthritis affects the joints in your toes, further deformities stemming from arthritis can occur

Trauma – Direct trauma to the toes could potentially lead to hammertoe

Ill-fitting shoes – Undue pressure on the front of the toes from ill-fitting shoes can potentially lead to the development of hammertoe

Treatment

Orthotics – Custom made inserts can be used to help relieve pressure placed on the toes and therefore relieve some of the pain associated with it

Medications – Oral medications such as anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs could be used to treat the pain and inflammation hammertoes causes. Injections of corticosteroids are also sometimes used

Surgery – In more severe cases where the hammertoes have become more rigid, foot surgery is a potential option

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Marlboro and Watchung, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Hammertoe
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